C E L E S T E

"Celeste"

 

Richard Leo Johnson

 

Richard's newest release is the third installment in a series of mythical characters.

The first in the series was the highly acclaimed "The Legend of Vernon McAlister" followed by "Who Knew Charlie Shoe".

Now we have "Celeste".

Using a one-of-a-kind instrument provided by Martin Guitars, the "Alien" guitar is both visually and structurally unique.

Artist, Michael Brolly, designed and built the guitar.

Michael has had penchant for the alien theme for years and has created a large body of work based on that concept.

Michael was commissioned by Martin to build a guitar for Chris Martin IV.

The result was an acoustic guitar with a theremin built into the body.

Soon thereafter arrangements were made to have his instrument shipped to Savannah for Richard to make a recording.

The resulting body of work on "Celeste" is a mix of haunting, mysterious, and sonically unique music that defies any style or category. This is an earmark of Richard's music as cited by most of his reviews...a singular voice in the world of the guitar.

Now with the added twist of the theremin and the blending of the sonic qualities of the two instruments, we have a perfect storm for yet another amazing recording by this distinctive artist.

 

The legend continues...

Vernon McAlister was abducted by an alien craft while he was camping in the woods near Meridian Mississippi in 1968.

The strange and frightening encounter consisted of Vernon being forced into a breeding ritual with an alien female.

It was like a dream, both erotic and surreal, and Vernon woke up back at his campsite with a feeling of wonderment.

He went on about his travels and never spoke of the encounter with anyone.

Several years later, a mysterious and beautiful young lady "Celeste", was showing up at random places, playing an unusual guitar and singing with a voice that was other-worldly.

Anyone that heard her was immediately moved and amazed...it seemed as if she had 3, sometimes 4, separate voices.

Astoundingly, the songs had no determinable words, but everyone listening seemed to know what exactly she was saying.